Effects of a 12-week series of Feldenkrais® Awareness Through Movement® classes on functional ability, quality of life, and kinesiophobia on retirement age adults

  • Madeleine Edgar Dip. Phty., Feldenkrais Practitioner®, Private Practice, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
  • Greg Anderson BE, Graduate Student, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
  • Neil Tuttle PhD, Senior Lecturer, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University; Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Queensland, Australia
Keywords: Feldenkrais Method, somatics, phenomenology, embodiment, health

Abstract

Aim: This investigation examined the impact of a 12-week series of Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement (ATM®) classes on the functional ability, quality of life and kinesiophobia of a group of active retirees.

Method: Twenty-seven participants completed three questionnaires, the patient specific functional scale (PSFS), WHOQOL-BREF, and the Tampa Kinesiophobia Scale before and after the program. Paired T tests were used to evaluate the differences between the time points.

Results: There was a significant change in the PSFS after the twelve-week program (1.4 out of ten point (p < .001) improvement). There were no statistically significant differences in the other measures, though the mean for the group moved from what is considered a “high” level of kinesiophobia to a “normal” level.

Conclusion: Functional limitations were improved following a 12-week period of Feldenkrais ATM classes. The results are consistent with previous studies that suggest that the best way of evaluating the impact of the Feldenkrais Method may be using items that the individual selects as occurs with the PSFS rather than scales where the items being evaluated are fixed and/or standardised.

Author Biographies

Madeleine Edgar, Dip. Phty., Feldenkrais Practitioner®, Private Practice, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia

Madeline received her Dip. Phty. (as it was in 1959) from Melbourne University and was Certified as a Feldenkrais Practitioner in Brisbane in 1993. She worked as a Physiotherapist for 33 years in Geriatric care and in her private practice as a Feldenkrais Practitioner for the last 23 years giving FI lessons and running ATM Classes. She has given many presentations and Feldenkrais lessons to different organisations and on the radio – in the Gold Coast region of Australia. She also published two Marvellous Movement workbooks on the Feldenkrais Method and 50 ATMs on CDs. Madeleine is an Emeritus Fellow of the Australian Feldenkrais Guild. She is now retired, but still continues to promote the Feldenkrais Method whenever possible.

Greg Anderson, BE, Graduate Student, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia

Gregory was born in Southport, Australia, in 1991. He received the B.E. degree in exercise science from Griffith University 2013. Greg is currently studying a post-graduate certificate in Public health with a view to continue post-graduate studies. He is currently interested in health and fitness in urban populations in both developed and developing countries.

Neil Tuttle, PhD, Senior Lecturer, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University; Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Queensland, Australia

Neil is a physiotherapist and academic. He is particularly interested in improving methods of teaching both physical and reasoning skills. His areas of research include individual treatment responses, manual therapy for neck pain, simulated learning environments in health professional education. He is interested in palpation skills in the assessment of neck pain, lymphoedema, and the prevention of bruising in avocados.

Published
2016-05-20
How to Cite
Edgar, M., Anderson, G., & Tuttle, N. (2016). Effects of a 12-week series of Feldenkrais® Awareness Through Movement® classes on functional ability, quality of life, and kinesiophobia on retirement age adults. Feldenkrais Research Journal, 5. Retrieved from https://feldenkraisresearchjournal.org/index.php/journal/article/view/20
Section
Original Research